IOM Risk Assessments

risk assessments

As we are going on a small trip on Monday, the teachers and myself have had to carry out a risk assessment. The trip involves walking around the local area identifying different types of homes and the materials they are made out of. This is linking to our Geography topic and science. The risk assessment involved the teachers and I walking around the area the children would be following on the day. When the risk assessment was physically complete it was then formally completed. In the IOM all schools use ‘evolve’ to record their risk assessments and notify the department.

The sections that had to be filled in for the risk assessment were: purpose of the trip and the learning outcomes, emergency contact, dates, travel arrangements, leaders name, other staff attending, checking the ration is correct and specific risk assessments.

This an easier, quicker way to formally complete risk assessments for trips – especially as it takes you through step by step ensuring the correct data is there. As it is also sent to the department this ensures that they know about this quicker than sending it via post.

This experience has taught me how to carry our a risk assessment prior to a trip including how the schools on the IOM record their information – this is meeting Part two of the Teachers’ Standards.

The unexpected life of a teacher… IOM

During the second week on my Isle of Man placement, the pupils acrossick kids the school began to become ill with the norovirus. At the end of the week, on the Thursday, the school was closed for a deep clean over the weekend. As Monday approached, the children and teachers thought this would have been done, however it wasn’t, therefore no one was allowed in the school. 

This is when it was decided by the Headteacher and the Department that the school/pupils/teachers would utilise the old Fair-field School building for the duration of the week. Therefore, as of Tuesday the school was moved and everyday life continued. 

However, the school life was not normal. Due to the lack of equipment in the building (only furniture) and the change of children’s concentration/behaviour, teaching could not be carried out as effectively as it usually could. 

The children carried out many tasks; reading, small maths activities, Easter craft as well as Easter cooking. The children who attended gained a great deal of respect and appreciation for their school as it came to the end of the week the children began to realise thmanxe massive difference a change in environment can make. Even though formal teaching was not as accessible as usual, continuous provision was ongoing. As well as this, trips to the Manx Museum and the local library and park also occurred. 

Another dilemma the school encountered was the debate between the name of our new pop up school, the headteacher was interviewed by a local radio regarding this (Yes, that is me in the feature image… I am famous!)  Interview

I learnt a great amount from this experience. I learnt that teachers lives are not as simple as some may make out, as many occurrences can happen which will alter a whole weeks planning, or a sports event, or a teacher bake off… however some encounters may not be as drastic as ours. 

I also learnt and experienced how a school can come together as a unflexibleit to meet the needs of the children including being flexible. Regardless of the limited teaching, the children had various of learning experiences. I also learnt how to carry out a risk assessment for school trips and how to manage children in these situations. 

I had to scrap my original lesson plans for that week and plan completely different ‘spare of the moment’ sessions that the children could enjoy and engage with. Not all normal school life encounters changed, behaviour was still in order, with usual routines and the children still did their 10 minute zumba every morning… just on the play ground instead of the hall.

The third week of my IOM placement was an unexpected one but it is one I am most proud of and one I will share for many years to come.

The Curriculum and Assessment in IOM

assessmentSince 2006 IOM schools have had no SATS, in either KS1 or KS2, as well as no OFSTED. This may lead to some questioning if education in IOM is ‘up to scratch’ compared to England. However, it is shown in academic results at the end of Primary and Secondary that children are achieving the same levels and grades.

 

For both Literacy and Mathematics to assess and track children’s learnign teachers use statements which are allocated into levels and are called ‘I can statements’. For example in mathematics an ‘I can’ statement in Level 2A is ‘I can describe and sort 2d shapes’. Schools in the IOM have the freedom to create their own documents and tracking grids to best suit their school and to follow these ‘I can’ statements.

Instead on OFSTED, schools are still inspected by the department for education but they are not graded and teachers are assessed alongside a personal reflection for the teachers themselves. I believe this is an interesting way of assessing schools and teachers because teachers will have to constantly reflect and set targets for their professional development. download

When schools are proving children’s learning and grades in both Literacy and Mathematics, teachers have to have a minimum of 4 pieces of evidence in that area, all with different dates as well as other evidence which is in other curriculum areas. For example, if a teacher is proving a child is a 2A for measure, the teacher will need 4 pieces of evidence from mathematics sessions over the year as well as other evidence in subjects such as Science to show the child can master that skill.

The evidence that is used to prove the child’s abilties does not have to be worksheets done by the children, it can be:

  • teachers notes
  • work books
  • summative tests/quiz’s
  • games
  • pupil comments
  • photographs (whiteboards)
  • models
  • in house moderation

This the builds a bank of support to prove that the child is able in that area.

I believe that this is an ideal way to assess and justify children’s learning, however, teachers need to know their children in more depth and teachers need to constantly be assessing and tracking progress.

As well as this, the Isle of Man have a curriculum which is embedded in many schools that readies children for life. They are called the 6R’s.

It is intended that as a result of experiencing the curriculum and the way it is delivered, young people will develop as individuals with:

  • Readiness
  • Relationships which are positive
  • Resourcefulness
  • Resilience
  • Remembering Skills
  • Reflectiveness

In the school I am in, they do not follow this exact curriculum due to the freedom schools have on the island. Therefore, my school have ‘Secrets to Success’ which are as follows:

Secrets to success

  • Understand others
  • Imagine
  • Improve
  • Don’t give up
  • Push Yourself
  • Concentrate
  • Try new things
  • Work Hard

Reflection… 

During my first two weeks in an IOM school, I have learn a great deal about the way they assess and track progress of their children. Through first hand experience I have found these tactics easier in some aspects. For example, when tracking progress and identifying next steps for children it is much easier to identify what that is using the tracking/levelling format. On the other hand, I believe it could be seen as more work for teachers however, once this is learnt I believe it is equally as beneficial than England’s assessment and criteria.

Target…

I would like to continue to use the IOM tracking and assessment documents and reflect upon this at the end of the placement.

This information has supported and will continue to support my development in TS 2, 3, 5 and 6. TS2 and 6 because I am learning about assessment and progress in a different area. TS3 because I am learning about someone else’s curriculum and TS5 because I am adapting my teaching to meet the needs of the children who are following this curriculum. 

Isle of Man – First Reflection.

Following my first week in the Isle of Man placement, I have had much to reflect upon in relation to the school environment. 

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I am currently in a Year 1/2 class, which is open planned with the other year 1/2 classes. In the middle of all of the classes there is a open middle area where continuous provision occurs daily.

Even though the children have time to choose their activities there is still structure and guidance given by teachers as they plan interesting and useful challenges weekly. These challenges like to the children previous work such as following interactions to make something which links to their english LO’s of the week or links to the topic for the term of ‘healthy me’.

The following images are the challenges for week 2 of my time at the setting.

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The activities are introduced to the children on a Monday and children have the resources and knowledge to accomplish them. They are called challenges are children put their skills and knowledge learnt in class to the test by carrying out the challenges. This is the teachers meeting Teacher standard 1 and also Teacher Standard 2 by children taking responsibility for their work/learning.

As my placement progresses I would like to take responsibility in creating some of the challenges for the children as I believe it will support my development in structuring continuos provision as well as planning activities to challenge children. 

Another reflection regarding my first week in a Isle of Man school is the attitude the schools have towards children’s learning. After discussing and comparing with fellow trainees, we have all come to realise that the schools are vastly child based and orientated. The majority of the teaching, learning and atmosphere is based around the children’s likes and preferences.

Examples of this are:

  • Learning and work is based around their likes. For instance in Year 2 the children wanted to learn about their body so this was the topic for the next term
  • Children wanted to climb trees and make dens at play times, so rules and equipment were put into place.

As well as the learning, assessment is different in the Isle of man, as they do not fully follow the National Curriculum and use tracking tick grids to assess children. As well as this, levels are still used throughout the years and the grids are in levels when assessing. The children I am working with are at an average level 2C. However, as this is my first week I have not learnt a vast amount about this but assessment is a large area I would like to develop during my time here, so I intend to progress in this area. This will support my development in TS6. 

Due to the children’s learning styles and the difference in the schooling in the Isle of Man to England, I have had to adapt my teaching and responses to cater for the children. This is supporting my development in TS5 and I will continue to develop this throughout my teaching and planing. 

The Isle of Man Schooling allows the children to continue to be children whilst learning in a fun, creative way. This is the main reason I enjoy the school and teaching in the Isle of Man because it encourages the children to be enthusiastic about their learning and also increases enjoyment.

Safeguarding

Attendance issues with children may indicate safeguarding issues.

A child who may seem as the ‘golden child’, who does not misbehave or is quiet, may be a child who is being abused. Talking to the child and knowing their personality traits will support educators ability to identify whether abuse is occurring or not.

safeguarding im

It is important to know the important policies to support the children and yourself during a safeguarding incident.

When children disclose to an adult, they should stay calm and not show emotion or shock to ensure the child can confidently speak.

There is an increase in child abuse and neglect, England and Wales have a greater increase in neglect. Aspects of this could be due to the cut backs in social services and CAMS. 

An overall increase of abuse is online abuse and this is due to the technology rise. Teachers and Parents need to be aware what children are on and who they are talking to.

When a child discloses to a school member or it is suspected: 

  • Listen to the child – have the rest of the class covered by another teacher if possible to focus on the child
  • multi-agency working is paramount as well as training
  • cannot keep the information a secret
  • no matter the concern it should be voiced

It is important to make children aware of safeguarding so they are aware and this can support them in feeling comfortable in disclosing. 

 

 

 

Fundamental British Values

Throughout our Academic and Professional Development sessions, we have looked Fundamental British values and ways this can be taught and discussed in a class room. 

british-values2

 

Values are – attitude/belief regarding what you think is intrinsically good and contributes to our own/others well being.

 

 

 

TS 2012 – not to undermine fundamental British values’

FUNDAMENTAL BRITISH VALUES 

  1. Democracy
  2. The rule of law
  3. Individual Liberty
  4. Mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths or beliefs.

british-values

Why is Britain multicultural?

  • Britain had a lot of power in the past owning many countries in the world
  • Many faiths and beliefs are in Britain due to this ^

Children gain their ideas from media and appearance – children need to be taught that regardless of their beliefs and appearance this does not distinguish someone is not British.

Britishness

What will make an individual British, children can explore this and this would be a starting point regarding children’s ideas towards being British and the values.

  • Loss and nostalgia
  • vulnerability
  • shared values of Britishness are synonymous with a strong society

Boundaries to this:

  • racial
  • historical
  • civic
  • instrumental
  • lifestyle
  • multicultural

Children are able to discuss what they believe regarding diversity and Britishness and convey their ideas about this. Teachers need to elicit this to then provide fundamental British values and discuss the aspects around this.

  • Britain = multicultural society 

  • Difference seen as a threat 

  • INCLUSIVE NOTIONS AND IMAGES OF BRITISHNESS 

  • Society come together via identifying British values which all should adhere to 

 

How am I going to use this on placement?

History and debates can support children in learning about British values. Debates can show children how the laws and ideas regarding British values come about.

Schools will have values and ethos and this is a beginning of informing children of values which should be embedded through out the school.

Equality, diversity and bullying policies should be embedded throughout the school and this will be breaching and learning of British values.

Information regarding Rue of Law Value

  • Discuss the importance of school, class and country laws, as well as rules when dealing with behaviour.
  • Invite visitors from local police to explore pupils’ understanding of the responsibilities held by various professions.
  • Ensure a consistently applied Behaviour Policy is shared with the children and visible in all areas of the school.
  • Create trained buddies, who operate on the playground to support children and help them.
  • Recognise pupils who are modelling behaviour consistent with the school’s high expectations and ensure that they are seen as role models to others.
  • Ensure that children understand their own and others’ behaviour and its consequences, and learn to distinguish right from wrong.
  • Collaborate with the children to create the rules and codes of behaviour and ensure that all young people understand that rules apply to everyone.
  • Visit local law courts to learn how they work, or arrange a visit from a magistrate.
  • Use Crown Prosecution Service resources to enable pupils to learn about the criminal justice system.

During this seminar we created a block of sessions around FBV.

FBV 3 Session Plan format- The Rule of Law

Oral Story telling

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A teacher can hide behind a book and tell a story in an original way.

HOWEVER,

there are ways a teacher can tell a story
through memory and using prompts to engage children in the experience.

Everyone is a story teller and use prior experiences to do this. We tell stories on a daily basis and it will be beneficial for children to experience quality storytelling as it will support them in the future.

Oral story telling can support teachers in adding their own ideas/thoughts regarding characters/plot and also express their emotions about this. This can then lead to children questioning similar aspects which will support their comprehension skills.

The process could use puppets, the children as characters or objects that symbolise themes.

story-telling

 

The teacher can use their voice to alter characteristics of the characters and this will engage the children as the teacher could add humour is necessary, which will engage the children.

Ability to tell a story using their imagination is a skill for children

 

Story telling is about sharing

  • not just a story but opinions, views, emotions and experiences.
  • There needs to be a connection between reader and listener – therefore is a teacher is reading a book directly this may be a barrier to the connection.
  • as well as, if the connection is apparent the children will then be developing listening skills.
  • children can also engage with call and response to engage them fully

Children could practice this with a traditional fairy tale or stories and morals, as well using their experiences or work they have written themselves. instead of children reading their work from their book in a plenary, why not let the children tell the class orally as they could expand their ideas and is a prime opportunity for assessment.

When children are telling a story from a book they need to make it their own, this is because it will develop their thoughts about the original and also imagination.

Children need support in how to tell a story from memory and a way to begin this process is good modelling.  Then resources such as story cards or jigsaws could be used to help children with storytelling.

REFLECTION 

I believe this style of teaching supports motivating children (TS1) as well as planning adapted sessions to meet the children’s needs (TS4 and TS5). For instance if a english reading session may begin to be tedious the teacher could alter this to meet the needs and motivate the children.

I would like to use this approach in the future as I believe it is an engaging approach and also interesting and fun. I also believe it can be used throughout the whole of the school as it can be used with a variety of books.